The legendary British brand returns with a 650 single

Finally, the wait is over. About this time last year, we wrote about the news that Mahindra Group in India had bought the rights to the BSA brand, and would be producing them in the UK. They just pulled the wraps off their debut model a day ahead of “Motorcycle Live 2021” in England. BSA sneak-previewed their all-new Gold Star 650 at England’s National Motorcycle Museum in Birmingham before the Motorcycle Live event at the NEC, the first in a series of motorcycles the brand plans to bring to market in the coming year(s).

BSA was purchased and revived by the Mahindra Group back in 2016, and the corporate heads have stated all along they planned to build the venerable Brit bikes in merry old England, specifically with an R&D facility in Banbury, then a manufacturing plant in Midlands. These particular debut bikes were designed and developed in the UK but built in India for now, until the UK plants are fully operational.

This new Gold Star 650 is propelled by a chain final drive 650cc single thumper, making about 45 hp, with about 40.5 ft. lbs. of torque. Not immensely impressive, but hey, it’s a 650 single. The bike’s styling is spot-on with spoked rims, a classic round headlight, chrome and paint teardrop tank with vintage-looking BSA Gold Star tank badges, dual pot analog displays, wide chrome handlebars, chrome “pea-shooter” pipe and a traditional two-up bench style seat. This is one classic looking bike, easily confused with it’s ancestors at first glance.

A second glance reveals an array of modern tech that will be included on the BSA machines. We’re seeing disc brakes with dual-channel ABS, water-cooling, emissions controls, adjustable rear shocks, and EFI of course. Unsure if these bikes will sport traction control or rider modes, but just spitballing here, we’re guessing they’re targeting the Royal Enfield Conti and INT 650 Twins so they might include these and other features to be competitive. No word yet on pricing, although when we shared the story last year, price “guesstimates” landed in the $6600-$13K ballpark, USD.

The BBC reported that BSA has built a technical center in Coventry, England, for the express purpose of developing an line of electric BSA models. They apparently received a 4.6 million (Euro) grant from the British government to develop zero-emissions bikes. These will be developed and built along with these petrol-powered Gold Stars and other models, for the foreseeable future. For now, we look forward to getting eyeballs on more shots and footage of these new BSAs, and applaud Mahindra for reviving an iconic brand and planting them back in their homeland of England.

Rob

*photos by BSA Motorcycles (their Facebook page) 

13 Comments

  1. Ren

    Good piece, Rob. Thank you.
    They’re gorgeous.

    Reply
    • Rob Brooks

      Thank you Ren. Looking forward to them coming stateside. Would love to ride one.

      Reply
      • Mangesh

        Beautiful…..and the Bantam could be the super light electric bike for the city…

        Reply
  2. H Steven Plimley

    They missed the mark, needs to be at least a twin. Single will never sell to people in the know.

    Reply
    • Andrew Rolfe

      They will sell, you overestimate your knowledge of British single lovers.

      Reply
    • Jim panzee

      People in the know live big singles……

      Reply
  3. David Carmichael

    Exciting, would love a twin with more power and improved updates, love sound and feel of a twin.

    Reply
    • Rob Brooks

      We were anticipating a twin as well, but still hoping to get a test ride if/when they come Stateside.

      Reply
    • Mangesh

      Yes…but a single with a nice exhaust has it’s own low rpm charm

      Reply
  4. Rob Kerian

    Please consider building a BSA 650 Gold Star SCAMBLER. I have fond memories of my 1972 500 Gold Star scrambler.

    Reply
  5. John Main

    I rode Triumph Bonneville in 68. The bike handled so differently from the 305 Super Hawk Honda I had at the time. Just something unique about way it cornered. To this day after 20+ bikes I still think about how that Bonneville cornered. Graceful explains it.

    Reply
  6. Brenton Griffiths

    THE MOTORCYCLE SHOULD HAVE BEEN AN AIRCOOLED 650CC TWIN. THIS IS WHAT RETRO IS ALL ABOUT.

    Reply
    • Mangesh

      This could be the first step in the back to basics before everything turns electric

      Reply

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